Rylo 4K 360° camera uses a one-tap app to produce cinematic videos

Launched today by a company of the same name, Rylo is a 360-degree camera that uses some nifty software to produce “beautiful, cinematic video” that is “impossibly smooth.” You just focus on shooting, and Rylo can just about handle the rest.

Rylo relies heavily on companion software that makes it possible to transform the raw 360-degree content into smooth videos, including ones that follow specific points of interest or that track a specific object. The camera can also be used to generate stabilized, moving time-lapse videos.

The portable little camera features integrated horizon leveling and stabilization to produce smooth videos in the absence of a stabilization rig, something possible “no matter the conditions,” according to the company. To capture the raw 360° video it uses a pair of lenses—one on the front and the other on the back—both with a 208-degree FOV and fixed F2.8 aperture. Content is captured as 4K 360° 30fps footage and can be output in a variety of ways: from 6K 360 panoramic photos, to 4K 360° video, to standard 1080p.



Rylo includes a 16GB microSD card for storage, but supports cards with capacities up to 256GB. Other features include an anodized aluminum alloy body, small OLED display, and a single button for both powering on the device and recording. The internal rechargeable battery supports about 60 minutes of continuous recording.

But the specs aren’t the key thing here; Rylo really shines when coupled with its related software and all of the features it enables.

The company bills its product as a way for anyone to shoot and produce cinematic video. “The combination of Rylo’s hardware and software gives anyone the confidence and creative freedom to get the perfect shot every time,” company CEO Alex Karpenko explained in a press release.

After capturing footage, the user plugs the camera into the smartphone where the companion mobile app automatically offers one-tap options to edit the video. This process reduces the editing time from hours to minutes, according to the company. Whether that final footage is as good as the footage “hours” would have produced is, of course, dependent on your skill as a video editor.

Source: dpreview.com

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